Nature Insight: Random Bouquet

Copyright 2012 by DM Denton

The old ink bottle did quite well for
holding thoughts that randomly put a
bouquet on the windowsill and
memory on some passing page
of windflowers from filtered
woods, kingcups from the water’s
side–while spotted lungwort,
first buds of buttercup,
and also bird’s eye
forget-me-nots found
me lost in my
garden, as if
unaware
that I let
them grow
there.





©Artwork and writing, unless otherwise indicated, are the property of Diane M Denton. Please request permission to reproduce or post elsewhere with a link back to bardessdmdenton. Thank you.

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40 thoughts on “Nature Insight: Random Bouquet

  1. Hi Diane,
    this is lovely again 🙂 I also have a little bouquet of flowers that just grow uninvited in my garden, like buttercups and dandelion, and something white, and they look so pretty 🙂

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  2. Of course I loved this, Diane–your unashamed fan, I am. I especially like the words, “forget-me-nots found me lost”–I may have taken them out of context, but they really ministered to my heart and soul today–so thank you very much! (Very, very much) I’m wondering if I might email you, and if so, do I use the earthlink address? You offered some comments recently on my poems, which made me want to “chat”–but I’m aware you may be too busy for such trivialities. God bless your day abundantly–sending love, Caddo

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    • You may take anything I write wherever you need! That’s the wonderful thing about connecting through creativity…the giving it away, as it were, for others to use (and hopefully not abuse) as they need. And to know that something ministered to you heart is such a complement! Yes, please email me on the earthlink address. I would love to chat! Blessings! Diane XO

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  3. I love this concept of the wildflowers being unaware they were “permitted” to grow in your garden! And the old ink bottle is the perfect vase here! This one is pure joy, Diane!

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  4. Very lovely – words and art! I like how you cleverly tied the writing, artwork, and flowers all together in a nice poem package. That was the interpretation that came to mind.

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  5. You are still absolutely one of my favourite creators in the whole world. You never fail to delight and enchant me. I particularly loved
    ‘forget-me-nots found
    me lost in my
    garden, as if
    unaware
    that I let
    them grow
    there’
    Your words evoke so much… that lovely sense of being ‘lost’ somewhere so safe and well-known; of being ‘found’ in such a gentle manner by these beauties, the things that we leave to blossom, a mutual giving of space and pleasure…

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    • Dear Laurel, I’m so so flattered by your comment, and delighted by your delight! So much so I can only think to echo your very special words which have made my day brighter and lighter and more precious…

      ‘…that lovely sense of being ‘lost’ somewhere so safe and well-known; of being ‘found’ in such a gentle manner by these beauties, the things that we leave to blossom, a mutual giving of space and pleasure…’

      Thank you for all your encouragement and support…I can’t even begin to express how much it means to me! Love and hugs, Diane

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  6. Diane, this is a lovely bouquet of words (and as always I love the painting!) And great ending words:

    “as if
    unaware
    that I let
    them grow
    there.”

    I’ve had that feeling, out in my garden with the wildflowers. 🙂

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  7. Diane, Ralph Waldo Emerson was the one who gave us permission to use lists to help make a poem. “Bare lists of words are found suggestive, to an imaginative and excited mind,” he said. “Nature offers all her creatures to him (the poet) as a picture- language.” This poem gains its power from the list of flowers you present as residing in an old ink bottle. You have taken both of these quotations from Emerson’s essay, The Poet, and bottled them up into a feast for the excited mind, the picture of language. This and the drawing are delightful.

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    • Hi Thomas! Thank you so much for your, as always, engaged and engaging comment. I had been aware of this little piece as a list…hadn’t thought of the Emerson quote but am so glad you pointed it out as I hadn’t read his essay for a long time. It seemed so natural to me to let the flowers ‘speak’ for themselves. They are beautiful art and poetry already, aren’t they? Perhaps, sometimes, it is the poet’s role to just let them be…a feeling of falling where they will, just like the little bouquet in the ink bottle. I am a very visual writer, even in prose, and love your phrase ‘the picture of language’! Thank you again!

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  8. Just lovely…a charming poem of wayward gifts that show up in our gardens and a beautiful piece of artwork to accompany it. I love your nature drawings so much..so delicate and appealing to my taste.

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    • Hi Gayle! I love your phrase ‘wayward gifts’ for that is the treat and charm of flowers growing where they will, isn’t it? That we can relinquish having to do anything but enjoy them and honor their generosity. I am so glad this was to your liking!

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    • Thank you for ‘stopping in’, Lance, and for your lovely comment! I am so glad you enjoyed this one. I wish I had more time to paint all the flowers ‘that appear’ this time of year (thanks goodness for digital cameras!). Kingcups or Marsh Marigolds are among my favorites (and so are a zillion others…)

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  9. Beautiful play with words which capture something very vivid! My daughter loves picking wild flowers and bringing them home to me to put in a vase. 😉

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