Guest Post: Song of Paper by Cynthia Jobin

Today I am pleased to host Deborah Bennison regarding the latest publication from her independent press. This volume was truly a labor of love, exhibiting the excellence of content and presentation always representative of Bennison Books.

 

Readers of Diane’s blog may already be familiar with the New England poet Cynthia Jobin, whose blog attracted many followers worldwide. Admirers of her work will be delighted to learn that a collection of her poetry, Song of Paper, has just been published by Bennison Books.

 

Amazon.com (https://amzn.to/2A8Pq3d)

Amazon UK (https://amzn.to/2NFTF9M)

 

With a fine intelligence and shining poetic sensibility, Cynthia documents the joys and griefs that mark the common humanity of our everyday lives. She explores the inexplicable exhilaration and longing that love brings and courageously delineates the crushing desolation she felt at losing her lifelong partner.

The magnificent sequence of poems which close the collection trace the journey towards her own impending death and the deeply moving acceptance with which she finally faced it.

 

Excerpt from the introduction

Shortly before her death in late 2016, Cynthia entrusted her poetic legacy to the UK poet John Looker who had long admired her work. The following is an excerpt from John’s introduction to Song of Paper:

Cynthia Jobin’s poetry is skillfully crafted and both erudite and accessible. She wrote about the mysteries of life, her grief following the death of her partner of 43 years, love and friendship, the joy of pets and the landscape of New England. She also translated French poetry. There was a depth of feeling and an unobtrusive intellect at work, but equally a lightness of touch and humour. The poems in this collection show that variety of theme and equally her range of tone; she would write just for fun as well as with serious intent.

When reading a new poem from Cynthia Jobin I have always had that comfortable feeling of being in good hands: we know that the verses are going to be impeccably crafted but we can’t predict what path they will take.

I am sure that new readers and old friends alike will discover this for themselves on reading this collection. The title, Song of Paper, comes from the opening poem and feels so apposite. The closing poem, which was also the last she ever posted in life, and which shows humour even in the midst of wisdom and courage, is an immensely moving reflection from someone who knew herself to be very close to death.

The late Cynthia Jobin

Below are extracts from two poems included in this collection
and the full version of ‘To a Tulip’.

Extract from ‘The Palpable Obscure’:

Once a day, at least, I stop to wonder

where you are.  I do not think of

you as being here.  Except, tonight

 

a heightening of powers in the darkness

wants to break November from October

with a cold slap and a small wail in the wind.

Something more than me, something much

more sure that you abide, this night, brings

you, in ways that I can almost touch.

****

Extract from ‘Riviera Reverie’:

The boy cat, all noblesse oblige,

takes his reserved, tacitly acknowledged place.

 

Drawn to their warm, imaginary blankets

spread upon the floor, these beloved creatures

 

bring to mind the worshipful habitués

of Côte d’Azur, Côte d’Or.  As the sun reaches

 

they respond, grab on, luxuriate

and, for this brief moment, even teach.

 

Should a phone call come for any one of them

I’ll say they are away, gone to the beach.

****

To a Tulip 

You,

yellow flower

standing in a cobalt vase,

unfurling blades,

stemmed sacramental cup –

winter was hard

but now your simple grace

is green announcement:

things are looking up.

There by the window you

to sunlight are the antiphon,

beauty new as beauties past,

spring’s insistence

life should carry on.

Yet you become

most beautiful at last,

when age and death are

what you must fulfill:

come that night

you can no longer

close against the dark,

you open wide until

you are all heart,

and every petal knows

translucence as it falls.

You could be hinting

how to do it, for us all.

Copyright Cynthia Jobin estate; Bennison Books.

 

Song of Paper is available from:

Amazon.com

Amazon UK

Please check out all the excellent publications from Bennison Books!

Indra’s Net: all profits to The Book Bus charity

“Love reading poetry? Want to support a fantastic charity? All profits from this international anthology of poetry published by Bennison Books will go to The Book Bus.”

I’m so honored to have two poems included in this anthology, to be in the company of such excellent poets, and to be able to contribute to such a wonderful charity.

 

Bennison Books always offers the highest quality publications: “spearheading a new and exciting approach to publishing that puts authors and their work at the heart of everything (they) do. (Their) philosophy is simple: we publish great writing by authors (they) believe in.”

The title of this anthology, Indra’s Net, was suggested by one of its poets, the late Cynthia Jobin. She explained: “Indra’s net is a metaphor for universal interconnectedness. It’s as old as ancient Sanskrit and as ‘today’ as speculative scientific cosmology. It’s what came to mind when thinking about nets and webs and interconnectedness … and jewels and poems.”
~ from the forward by Carol Rumens, Poetry Editor for The Guardian, one of the United Kingdom’s most important newspapers

I invite you to purchase this anthology for the excellent poetry it offers and charity it supports.

The Book Bus  aims to improve child literacy rates in Africa, Asia and South America by providing children with books and the inspiration to read them.
Available from Amazon:
http://amzn.to/2tP9a77 (UK)
http://amzn.to/2tPnDzQ (US)

 

Indra’s Net: all profits to The Book Bus charity

Source: Indra’s Net: all profits to The Book Bus charity

Thank you for your support!

We’re crowdsourcing: submit your poem!

Poets! Here’s a chance to see your poetry published in a beautiful anthology (Bennison Books publications are always first class) AND contribute to The Book Bus, a very worth charity. Follow the link to learn more and how to submit!

Bennison Books

2blue-logoBennison Books is crowdsourcing poetry! No, we don’t want your money: we want your words.

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Review – Ghost Writings: Beyond the Obvious

Do you enjoy reading stories with a supernatural flavor?

Here is my 5 star review for …

Ghost Writings: A Ghost Story Guide Deborah Bennison (Editor) and Neil Wilson (Introduction)
Published by Bennison Books

Non-fiction
July 26, 2014

Ghost Writings: Beyond the Obvious

Ghost Writings by D. BennisonThere is much to learn about the essence and evolution of the ghost story in the pages of the unique, precisely conceived and satisfyingly constructed ‘Ghost Writings’. It is not merely a listing of ghost stories and their authors, in this case British. It is rich in information about the genre, with introductory in-depth essays by the ghost story bibliographer, Neil Wilson, who offers fascinating insights into its fairy-tale, folk, religious and occult origins, its variations reflective of fashions and obsessions, and its development through the ‘golden age’ of spiritualism, artistic movements, and physiological, scientific and technological advancements such as radio and film.

Included are brief but tantalizing biographies. Ms. Bennison honors the obvious—masters of the craft like Wilkie Collins, Charles Dickens and Bram Stoker—but, also, reveals “the double life” of literary figures not necessarily associated with the supernatural; one of the most surprising for me being E. Nesbitt, author of ‘The Railway Children’. There are others, great mainstream writers like L.P Hartley and D.H. Lawrence who ventured into other-worldly territory. Ghost Writings clears away the cobwebs from the lives and works of more obscure writers. The long list of female writers, a few well-known to me like Charlotte and Emily Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell and Agatha Christie, insists—as do all the other categories—on being investigated further.

Traveling the ghost story’s journey through time, I felt some regret that its traditional and subtle nature, which inspired “a pleasing terror” (to quote ghost story writer, M.R. James, 1862-1936), has been lost to a pessimistic and continuously violent post WWII world, the modern appetite for speed and sensationalism, and absence of fundamental moral consideration. Contributor, Neil Wilson, admits that in order for the genre to remain vital it must continue to embrace the changes that retain its relevance to the world in which its current readers live. He also acknowledges that the need to “exceed previous levels of sensationalism” drains, depresses and certainly desensitizes perhaps more than is healthy for the genre or its followers—not so unlike what happened towards the end of its Gothic era; after all, the beginning of yet another metamorphosis.

As a writer who has just incorporated a ghostly presence into a novel’s story line, I know how difficult it is to achieve with finesse and credibility. All the more reason I found this book engrossing and important. Ms. Bennison’s obvious passion for the subject and skilled editing and compilation effortlessly achieves her aim of enticing readers into exploring the ghost story through all its stages, possibilities and impossibilities; and, most importantly, far beyond the obvious.

Ghost Writings for Kindle: massive price drop for 7 days

to celebrate new paperback version

Click here to go to Ghost Writings at amazon.uk.

Ghost Writings Back Cover

 

 Hope you will take advantage of the great deal for the next few days on the kindle version, or why not purchase the brand new paperback version!

Also, check out Bennison Book’s other publications

And now I fade into the vapors of the electronic world
(and, perhaps, more than a few centuries ago) …

Copyright 2012 by DM Denton

Copyright 2012 by DM Denton

The Library Next Door

Copyright 2014 by DM Denton

Copyright 2014 by DM Denton

Books were Rose’s secrets. Reading was an easy distraction, friend to her curiosity and the only thing she was sure she wanted to do. When she entered the library next door, what was real and imaginary became indistinguishable, and she grew ready to reveal the future of her relationship with the written word.

My illustrated All Things That Matter Press Kindle-short, The Library Next Door, is now available! Only $1.99 to download. (£1.25 on amazon.uk).

ATTMP Scroll Cover

Find it on amazon.uk.

Here’s a little teaser:

Rose preferred private reading. It was an escape from her sisters’ bickering and her mother’s worries, achieved without purpose and self-consciousness; encouraging all the things she had been told to avoid like hunching her shoulders, crossing her legs, crooking her neck and straining her eyes.

Less clothing and her hair loose or in a braid improved the experience, so reading in bed was ideal, especially with a fine morning’s light spraying over the pages.  

Once in a while she thought about being a writer. She had the imagination for it even if she wasn’t educated or confident enough. Like Emily Dickinson, she hadn’t seen a moor or the sea, but knew the purple sparkle of heather and how waves swelled and swallowed the horizon. She was fond of imagery and long passages of pastoral descriptions, but less so of dialogue unless it was uncommonly interesting. Turning a page was like turning her brother’s desk globe; in a moment and without much effort she was on the other side of the world. Or peering into the eyepiece of his microscope she might view what would otherwise be invisible to her.

Reading silently was reading secretively, dreamily, self-centeredly, like listening to gossip and keeping it to herself. © 2014 by DM Denton

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Remember, you don’t have to have a kindle device to read kindle publications. You can download the app for your Android phone or tablet, iPad, iPhone, Mac, Windows 8 PC or tablet, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone.

I hope many of you will read it, and review it. And that the illustration will warm those of you who have been dealing with a frigid and sometimes wild winter so far – a little reminder of summer roses and soothing pastimes.

I must add an apology for being absent from so many of your blogs for a while. I hope to pay you a visit as soon as possible.

Thank you to All Things That Matter Press for their willingness and work in publishing this story, and to D. Bennison of Bennison Books for her encouragement and advice!

Keep warm and safe! Blessings.